Fennel

Fennel

Fennel

Fennel is highly prized for its licorice-like flavor and its health benefits. It has been used in natural remedies since ancient times.

Fennel  increase the flow of breast milk. Essential oil of fennel provides upset stomach relief, and tea made from ground fennel seeds is believed to be good for snake bites, insect bites, food poisoning, and soothing a sore throat.

Fennel contains:

73 calories
0.47 grams of fat
2.9 grams of protein
17 grams of carbohydrate
7.3 grams of dietary fiber
No cholesterol
A cup of fennel also provides:

360 micrograms (mg) of potassium
45 milligrams of sodium
838 international units (IU) of vitamin A
43 milligrams of calcium
10.4 milligrams of vitamin C
0.64 milligrams of iron
0.041 milligrams of vitamin B-6
15 milligrams of magnesium

The dietary fiber in fennel limits cholesterol build-up, absorbs water in the digestive system, and helps eliminate carcinogens from the colon, possibly preventing colon cancer.

Fennel contains significant amounts of fiber. As fiber helps lower the total amount of cholesterol in the blood, it decreases the risk of heart disease.

Fennel is a source of vitamin B-6, which plays a vital role in energy metabolism by breaking down carbohydrates and proteins into glucose and amino acids. These smaller compounds are more easily utilized for energy within the body.

Iron deficiency is one of the most common nutrient deficiencies in developed countries and a leading cause of anemia. Pairing foods like fennel that are high in vitamin C with foods that are iron-rich maximizes the body’s ability to absorb iron.

Vitamin C, the most active vitamin in fennel (17% of the daily value), has the strength to zap free radicals looking for a place to cause damage in the body, usually in the form of inflammation, which could lead to joint degeneration and arthritis. Other prominent vitamins and minerals in fennel include potassium, an electrolyte that fights high blood pressure

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